The story of Stone Age man’s use of flint

This story documents a brief history of the uses of flint by Paleolithic, Mesolithic and Neolithic man. It was inspired by finding flint throughout the woods in Seeley Copse and being told about the journey from the seabed to the south coast of the UK. https://youtu.be/W7XqdsU4Hfo If you have trouble accessing this video, please click … Continue reading The story of Stone Age man’s use of flint

Advertisements

Chlorophyll Chromatography!

Have a look at this video to see how to extract chlorophyll from leaves. A great experiment to do outdoors in woodland by the campfire... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WeYaZndpMic&feature=youtu.be   Sources used to support this post:  Hosikian, A., Lim, S., Halim, R. and Danquah, M. (2010). Chlorophyll extraction from microalgae: A review on the process engineering aspects. International … Continue reading Chlorophyll Chromatography!

The Striking Science of Match Sticks

How and when were matches invented? Match sticks may seem old-fashioned in comparison to today's methods of lighting a campfire with firelighters and smart gadgets but match sticks were revolutionary when first invented in 1826. Before this, the method for starting a fire hadn't developed since the stone ages where flint and rock were rubbed … Continue reading The Striking Science of Match Sticks

A critique of the themes and possible teaching applications of ‘Seeds Of Change’ by Jen Cullerton Johnson

This book is based on the real story of Wangari Maathai, a girl who grew up in Kenya with parents who fostered a love and appreciation for the natural environment. Wangari was encouraged to get an education and developed an interest in science which enabled her to study both in Nairobi and abroad in America … Continue reading A critique of the themes and possible teaching applications of ‘Seeds Of Change’ by Jen Cullerton Johnson

The A-Maize-ing Science of Popcorn

When kernels are heated, this increases the temperature of water that is stored in the endosperm section of the kernel. When this happens the water turns into steam and expands. As a result of the kernel having the hard outer shell (pericarp) which is non-pourous, the steam can not escape and so pressure builds up until the shell gives way (at around 180 degrees Celsius) and splits, turning the kernel 'inside out'

Where are the best places to look for spring wildflowers?

  Walking through the woods at Seeley Copse and documenting the locations of different spring flowers which had blossomed during the last weeks of March, I noticed clusters of flowers growing in certain formations along the route through the forest. This made me wonder why certain types of flowers grow where they do and what … Continue reading Where are the best places to look for spring wildflowers?

Spring Time Treasure Trail At Seeley Copse

After spending time in the forest, taking pictures and documenting the different plant species in Seeley Copse, I have created some activity sheets which can be used to facilitate a treasure hunt through the woods during the months of March - May to encourage children to observe and identify the diverse plant life that lives … Continue reading Spring Time Treasure Trail At Seeley Copse

Birdsong – Just Pretty Sounds or Complex Communication?

  Why do birds sing? We have all heard the sound of birds warbling, cooing, chirping and singing to each other, whether this be the pleasing dawn chorus of robins, blackbirds and sparrows or the jarring squawks of crows but have you ever considered why birds do this? After spending time in the woods at … Continue reading Birdsong – Just Pretty Sounds or Complex Communication?